Call for Live Artist Proposals

Abrupt Encounters is a new live arts program developed by a collective of creatively engaged participants with learning disabilities predominantly from Central Scotland.  This participatory arts program will result in new work in public spaces, with participants and live arts practitioners collaborating to create inclusive and challenging work that is highly visible and unexpected. Working over sites in Central Scotland, including Stirling Castle, the Changing Rooms, Forth Valley Royal Hospital and Falkirk Helix, we aim to present work which is temporal in nature, site specific, and explorative of what it means to create artworks and perform in public spaces and environments.

 We would like to invite proposals from Live Arts practitioners to take part in a series of Artists Presentation events exploring contemporary live arts practice in the UK.  These presentations will take the form of artist talks and information exchanges based at the Changing Room Gallery in Stirling.  They will focus on sharing examples of work with a mixed ability audience, exploring through presentation, discussion and practical workshop how live arts and participatory arts practice can combine to create work which is inclusive and of the highest quality.

 Artists will receive a fee of £200 inclusive for one day involving presentation, workshop and discussion.  Beyond that, there may be the possibility of future involvement working collaboratively on the Abrupt Encounters project.

 Artists should apply via written proposal (including links to previous projects) to Artlink Central by Monday 22nd October.  Artists must be members of PVG scheme.  Please contact info@artlinkcentral.org or call the Artlink Central office on 01786 450971 for further information, including information on the Artist Brief for Abrupt Encounters.

 Full Artist Brief Available on clicking this link

Abrupt Encounters is a First in a Lifetime project funded by Creative Scotland, Stirling Council, NHS Forth Valley, Falkirk Council and the Gordon Fraser Charitable Trust.

 

David McQuattComment